Jute: The fair trade and eco-friendly alternative to single use plastic bags

With the increasing demand to ban single use plastic bags, Trade Aids jute bags not only offer an environmentally friendly option but also an opportunity for N.Z. to help combat poverty through fair trade.
Trade Aid has been at the forefront of promoting sustainable and environmentally friendly shopping alternatives for decades, starting with the Just Jute campaign rolled out across 80 supermarkets in the early 90s and continuing today.
“We are thrilled to see promotion of sustainable development and environmental protection issues gain popularity not only within New Zealand and its supermarket chains but globally also,” says Delwyn Cox, local Trade Aid manager in Oamaru. “Our beautiful jute bags are among the products we receive from CORR – The Jute Works (CJW) in Bangladesh. These bags are made by talented artisans using traditional techniques.”
Trade Aid provides a unique selection of environmentally friendly, handcrafted, reusable jute bags. As N.Z.’s first fair trade guaranteed business, Trade Aid is proud to partner with many inspiring organisations, like the one with CJW in Bangladesh. Trade Aid has been working alongside artisans from CJW since 1973 with their products being the first shipment received by our organisation.
In 1973 Vi and Richard Cottrell, along with ten other like-minded people established a small not-for-profit society in Christchurch, known as Third World Retailers, which would later become Trade Aid. Trade Aid has spent over 40 years developing strong relationships with our partners. By supporting producers at a grass roots level with fair wages, and trading terms based on respect, Trade Aid is challenging global trade practices. Through our way of trade, and the fair prices we pay, producers and artisans from around the globe can invest in their businesses and communities, provide for their families and secure a bright future. Our products can all be directly traced back to the individual artisans who created them.
Pictured: Women from CJW groups Shadhupara, Beduria and Joynagacha. The jute bags provide the main source of income for these women.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *